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Archive for November, 2011

Solio Bolt

17 November 2011 2 comments

Solio Bolt

In August 2011, Solio released the Bolt, the successor to Solio’s Classic solar charger.

One of the new features to the Bolt is the Apple charging mode. Hold down the power button for five seconds, release, and the button should flash blue, instead of green. This provides for an optimized way to power up Apple devices, such as the iPhone and iPod touch. Unfortunately, it doesn’t officially charge up an iPad. Solio has hinted that they are working on a solution for iPads, though (nudge, nudge, wink, wink, say no more!).

With roughly a third larger area for solar panels than what the Classic possessed, the Bolt does appear to charge up its internal battery a little faster than the Classic. However, since the Bolt has a larger battery than the Classic (2000 mAh versus 1650 mAh), the additional solar panel coverage might be necessary to help top off the larger battery. Despite the increased size in battery and solar panels, the Bolt can still fold down enough to be placed within a coat pocket. When the Bolt is in its collapsed form, it is actually thinner and not as tall as the Classic, but it is wider.

One of my favorite changes with the Bolt is the inclusion of a standard USB port, which reduces the need for specialized cables and adapter tips. I have had no difficulties in charging up a device by using a standard USB cable. A micro-USB port is also present to be able to externally charge the Bolt. I haven’t tried to power up the Bolt using another solar panel yet, which I’ve used to assist the Classic in charging its battery. However, trying to get to the USB ports is a pain, due to the rubber cover is secured quite tightly. I ended up using a set of pliers to open the cover. Like the Classic’s port cover, it is hinged by a thin strip of rubber. Time will tell how long this lasts, or if it will eventually break off in a year’s time.

Like the Solio Classic, one checks the battery level of the Bolt by pressing the sole button on the back of the charger. (1 blink = 1-19%, 5 blinks = 80-100%) A major difference, though, is that pressing this button also acts as an On/Off switch for the charger. Even if one just wants to check the battery level, one must also remember to press the button again, otherwise, the Bolt will be turned on, which can be determined by the button blinking every couple of seconds. This is one change I did not care for and preferred the Classic’s method of only staying on if it was charging another device. Otherwise, accidentally turning on the Bolt can needlessly drain the internal battery. I appreciate the simplicity of this device, but it seems that Solio tried to cram too many functions into the sole button. This might have been a time where adding a second button or switch (say, to check the power level) would have made the Solio a little easier to initially use without needing to refer to the user manual (you did read the manual, right?).

The Solio Bolt builds upon and improves on the capabilities of its predecessor . Due to the massive surge of mobile phones, the Bolt would be a useful accessory to just about anyone, especially those who drain their phone’s battery in a day’s time.

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Categories: Bolt, Classic-i, Solar, Solio